Hello Everyone

So this week has been a busy one both at work and with my caring role.  The Carers Centre once again has been part of an England wide dialogue with the DWP on how working carers can remain in work and continue effectively with their caring role.  I want to thank the three wonderful carers who volunteered to take part, tell their stories, intelligently and patiently explain to professionals what language to use, use less jargon and get a better understanding of how carers combine working, being a student and caring.
 
We also had our brilliant Arts, Crafts and Conversation group as well as the first of our Thursday Walking group sessions, our walking guide Sharron reported back  ‘It was a bit on the cold side, so yesterday’s walk was around the Limehouse marina’ but fun was had by all.  This group is an excellent way to shrug off those January blues, get fitter and boost your immune system and of course have fun and chat with other carers.  So come and join the group each Thursday at 1pm..
 

As you can see it looks freezing or is it invigorating?

 
 
 
 
Don’t forget to get vaccinated, have your booster and flu jab – you and your loved ones deserve to be safer ……..
 

 

Where to get your next vaccine…

Click here for more info >

 


Local data update

Booster jabs now available for 16 and 17-year-olds

The Covid-19 booster programme has been extended to 16 and 17-years-olds this week, meaning anyone aged 16 or over is eligible for their booster vaccine three months after their second dose.

There are more clinics than ever offering vaccines in Tower Hamlets, so getting boosted couldn’t be easier. You can book online, walk-in to one of our many local sites or try out our vaccination bus which is on the road again this week.

Book an appointment >

 

Covid-19 in Tower Hamlets

Read the latest update on Covid-19 from our Director of Public Health, Dr Somen Banerjee, including the end of Plan B measures in England, changes to self-isolation rules, and rates of Covid-19 in the borough.

Read the update >


Next Weeks Activities


REMINDER – YOU CAN CHECK THE CCTH CALENDAR – 

If you want to know what activities are on each day at the centre then check out the CCTH Calendar – https://ccth.org.uk/calendar/?cid=mc-03c4653fb809aa02e303ae7a3bb5520a&month=9&yr=2021

Then email me tony@cth.org.uk to book your place.



To join just click on the Zoom link below:

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85904298253

Meeting ID: 859 0429 8253

 



27 January 2022 marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp. Every year on that day Holocaust Memorial Day takes place. In the words of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, Holocaust Memorial Day encourages remembrance in a world scarred by genocide.

One Day is the theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2022 – a day that we put aside to come together to remember, to learn about the Holocaust, Nazi Persecution and the genocides that followed in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur, in the hope that there may be One Day in the future with no genocide. We learn more about the past, we empathise with others today, and we take action for a better future.

The UK Ceremony for Holocaust Memorial Day 2022 will be streamed online on Thursday 27 January at 7pm. Register HERE to watch the Ceremony online.

At 8pm, get ready to Light the Darkness with us. Households across the UK will be lighting candles and safely putting them in their windows to remember those who were murdered for who they were stand against prejudice and hatred today.

There are a series of events planned in Tower Hamlets including reflections on Holocaust Memorial Day from the Tower Hamlets Interfaith Forum. Please CLICK HERE for more information and event listings.

#HolocaustMemorialDay #LightTheDarkness


Challenging Antisemitism: Holocaust Research, Art and Exhibitions
 

Thursday 20 January / 7.00 to 9.00pm / Zoom

An online panel event exploring how academic research, art and exhibitions can generate public awareness about the past and present. Following the success of last year’s guest exhibition at Four Corners Gallery, ‘My name is Sara’, this online panel event curated by the artist Sara Davidmann explores how academic research, art and exhibitions addressing issues of antisemitism and the Holocaust can generate new ways of raising public awareness about the past and present, including highlighting the rise of xenophobia and populism today.

Chaired by Prof David Feldman, Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, University of London.

Speakers:

James Bulgin, Head of Content, Holocaust Galleries, Imperial War Museum

Alex Maws, Head of Educational Grants and Projects, Association of Jewish Refugees

Dr Simone Gigliotti, Deputy Director, Holocaust Research Institute, Royal Holloway, University of London

This event is made possible thanks to the Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR)

BOOK YOUR PLACE

 


 

Check out a new free course that has just been launched that focuses on carer wellbeing. It is called ‘Physical activity for health and wellbeing in the caring role’ and has been kindly endorsed by the Carers Trust. The course is 6 hours in length and learners can achieve a ‘badge’ on completion of the end quiz, and this can be added on a CV to evidence their learning/continuous professional development. We hope that it will be helpful to those working with carers, including carer centre staff, those supporting carers less formally and importantly carers themselves!

https://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/physical-activity-health-and-wellbeing-the-caring-role/content-section-overview?active-tab=description-tab


 

 

In 2022 the Tower of London will be celebrating Her Majesty The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee by filling the moat with flowers to create a spectacular display.

From June to September the flower display will erupt into new colours and patterns creating a dramatic and engaging experience. Designed to attract pollinators, ‘Superbloom’ will bring a spectacular natural beauty to the urban space and introduce a new biodiverse habitat for wildlife. It will celebrate the value of nature for our wellbeing, giving people time to slow down, reflect and bask in the simple joy of flowers in bloom.

FIND OUT MORE

Volunteering Opportunities

Also here is information on the volunteering opportunities:

Volunteering is open to anyone 16 years old and over. There are 2 different roles available;

  • Base Level – meet and greet visitors and ‘man’ the slide entrance into the Moat
  • Within the moat – engaging with visitors on experience and interpretation content

 

No experience is required and training sessions will be offered from April. You can register your interest in volunteering here: Superbloom volunteering | Historic Royal Palaces (hrp.org.uk)

You can also get in touch with Alex with any questions, who is leading on the volunteering opportunities at: superbloomvolunteer@hrp.org.uk

 


 

Did You Know we have a weekly Shared Reading Group?

How does it work?

A group of carers, one of them a trained Reader Leader, reads a great novel, short story or poem aloud. We stop and talk about what we have read. There is no need for carers to read aloud or speak – it’s fine to just listen. The idea is to create a space where people feel at ease.

Reading the literature aloud in real-time, means that everyone is involved in a shared, live experience. Carers are encouraged by the Reader Leader to respond personally, sharing feelings, thoughts and memories provoked by the reading.

Everyone experiences the text in their own way, but the literature provides a shared language that can help us to understand ourselves – and others – better.

It can even help with your ESOL needs.

If this is for you then email tony@ccth.org.uk



 

WALKING ALONE? REMEMBER THESE 10 TIPS

1) Plan Your Route

Make sure you plan your route ahead of time. If you are walking in an area you are not familiar with, this can help keep you from getting lost. You will be able to walk with confidence. If you do get lost, don’t wander aimlessly, find a gas station, supermarket, or fast-food restaurant where you can ask for directions.

2) Make Sure Someone Else Knows Your Plans

Don’t go out when it is dark without telling someone, even if you are just taking the dogs out for a walk around your neighbourhood or walking home from a friend’s house nearby. It may seem paranoid, but in fact, knowing someone knows where you are can be reassuring and help you feel safe. If you fall and hurt yourself or run into trouble, and someone knows where you are, they can send help if you don’t arrive at your destination on time.

3) Always Carry Your Phone with You

Always carry your phone, but not for music or to make social calls as your walk. Your phone can be a lifeline if you see something suspicious or worse if something happens to you. Download a safety app on your phone, so you’ll be able to discreetly alert the authorities if you feel threatened or see something suspicious.

4) Avoid Suspicious People and Areas

Areas that are dark, deserted, or out-of-the-way, such as an alley or a parking lot, can be riskier than a well-lit area full of people. Stick to busy, lighted paths, to minimize the risks. Also, walk mainly in familiar places where you are known. That way, if you feel like a suspicious person is following you, you can always duck into a store you know or knock on a neighbour’s door. Avoid empty streets and pathways with thick shrubbery.

5) Keep Your Hands Free

Except for a flashlight and one of the items discussed below, keep your hands free. If you are carrying anything, put it all in one bag or backpack. This will make it easier for you to react if you notice someone following you. In a dangerous situation, carrying too many bags can keep you from moving as quickly as you can if your hands are free or if you only have one bag.

6) Carry a Non-Violent Deterrent

In addition to a flashlight, carry a non-violent deterrent such as a whistle, mace, or pepper spray. A whistle will help you alert others and call them to aid you if something is wrong. The loud noise may put off attackers, and they’ll move on to find someone else. Mace or pepper spray can give you enough time to evade a potential attacker, and in a pinch, a flashlight can be used as a weapon. Make sure you know how to use the mace or pepper spray to get its full effect.

7) Wear Reflective Clothing to Prevent Accidents

When it comes to personal safety, it’s not just about suspicious people. Areas with low visibility can be prone to accidents. Reflective clothing allows bikers and cars to see you as you walk along. A flashlight or headlight can also help drivers see you if there are dark stretches of road on your route.

8) Take a Self-Defence Class

When fighting off something as an assault, the element of surprise can work in your favour. If you regularly walk alone, take a self-defence class. You don’t have to become a black belt. In fact, it’s probably better to learn something like Krav Maga, which has been popular for self-defence. The idea is to disable your attacker enough for you to get to safety, and a class focused on self-defence will help give you those survival skills.

9) Remove Any Distractions

Keep your phone in your hand in case you need to hit the panic button on your safety app, but don’t let it distract you. When walking alone at night for exercise, music can be motivating and energizing but also distracting. You may not hear someone driving or walking up behind you. Avoid wearing headphones or talking on your phone as you walk.

10) Trust Your Gut

When walking alone at night, trust your gut. If you feel like an area or situation may be dangerous, don’t wait around to find out. Stop and scan your surroundings if you think someone is following you. If you are being followed, walk as quickly as you can to a well-lit public place. You can wait until you feel safe, or call a friend, a taxi, or an Uber to help you get safely get home at night.

Following these personal safety tips will help keep you stay safe when walking alone. Always be aware of where you are and alert to suspicious activity.


 

REMINDER TO CARERS

If you still need PPE for you and your loved one then Tower Hamlets are still providing PPE for Carers.

Collection and delivery is on Wednesday only from Mulberry Place, 5 Clove Crescent, E14 2BG. Carers can call or email Ayeda directly 0n 07366977103 or ayeda@ccth.org.uk to order.


 

Important Numbers:

Domestic Violence Duty Line:  020 7364 4986 between 9am – 5pm.Victim Support:  020 7364 2448/7957

 


Just wishing everyone a peaceful, safe and week and remember if you need information and advice from the Carers Centre just email enquiries@ccth.org.uk

Tony Collins-Moore
Carers Academy Manager

 

Get in touch

The Carers Centre
21 Brayford Square
London, E1 0SG

020 7790 1765

enquiries@ccth.org.uk

Opening hours

Monday - Friday – 9.30am – 5pm
Saturday and Sunday – Closed

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